2022 Arlington Mid-Year Single-Family Home Review

Question: How did the Arlington single-family home market perform in the first half of 2022?

Answer: We have reached two years of the average single-family home (SFH) in Arlington selling for
over the asking price, but like the rest of the economy, things are finally cooling down. However, the
“cool-down” data won’t start showing up for another month or two and the data you’ll see here, a
review of the first half of 2022, reflects what was mostly a red-hot market.

More Competitive, Less Price Growth?
By nearly all measures, the first half of 2022 was more competitive than the first half of 2021, yet we
got lower average and median price growth in ’22 than in ’21, compared to the first half of the year
prior.

The competition in the first half of 2022 was unlike anything we’ve seen in Arlington before with the
average SFH selling for 4.2% more than the asking price, compared to an average of 1.8% over ask
in the first half of 2021. In 2022, an insane 79% of homes sold within the first 10 days on market,
compared to 70% in 2021 and 73% of homes sold at or above asking price in 2022, compared to 66%
in 2021.

With such intense demand, one would expect to see higher price growth in 2022 than in 2021, but
that’s not the case. The average and median price change in the first half of 2022 was 7.1% and
5.6%, respectively, compared to the first half of 2021. From 2020 to 2021, the average and median
price change was 9.6% and 16.6%, respectively.

I think the reason for conflicting demand and appreciation data is two-fold. First, the 2021
appreciation is based on the first half of 2020, which included the first few months of COVID
lockdowns when the market basically froze, so those prices may have been somewhat artificially
deflated. However, the counter argument to that is comparing the first half 2020 prices to 2019 prices,
we got a healthy 5% appreciation in average price.

The second reason, and this is just a theory, is that by 2022 the market (sellers and listing agents)
knew that buyers were accustomed to paying significantly over the asking price and thus set more
conservative (lower) asking prices to ensure competition instead of setting prices that were more
reflective of actual/likely market values. Doing so would artificially inflate some demand measures
without causing a coinciding explosion in prices.
Since the beginning of the pandemic in the first half of 2020, the market has experienced the
following:

  • Median price increased by $225,000 or 23%
  • Average price increased $197,000 or 17.5%
  • Average seller credit (towards buyer closing costs) decreased by 75%
  • The number of homes sold for $2M+ increased from 5% to 11% of total sales
  • The number of homes sold for under $1M decreased from 53% to 31% of total sales


22205 Leads Growth, 22201 Still Most Expensive
The 22201 and 22207 zip codes remain significantly more expensive than other Arlington zip codes
as the only two with an average price higher than the county-wide average. The 22205 zip code has
benefitted from tremendous growth over the past five years and led the way in the first half of 2022
price growth, adding 12.7% to its 2021 first half average.

After gaining 19.8% in 2021, 22204 settled back down to a 5.1% increase on average price in 2022
and remains the only zip code with an average price below $1M, but with more new construction
popping up throughout the 22204 neighborhoods, I don’t expect the sub-$1M average price to last
much longer.

Market Conditions Are Demand-Driven
We hear a lot about under-supply being the main cause of extreme competition and significant price
appreciation. While that is true — we have been running low over the last few years on homes actively
listed for sale — the reason for the low supply is almost exclusively demand-driven (high absorption
rates) not because the number of homes being listed for sale has collapsed. As you can see from the
chart below, illustrating the number of SFH listed for sale in each quarter over the last decade, the
amount of inventory coming to market has remained relatively consistent.

What has changed is how quickly those homes are being purchased and that has caused the
average number of SFH actively for sale to drop significantly, per the chart below. One thing that is
particularly well illustrated is how much more of an effect the Amazon HQ2 announcement
(November 2018) had on demand, and thus active supply, compared to the COVID market that had
such a dramatic effect on other regional and national markets.

Looking Ahead
We have absolutely seen a shift in market conditions over the last couple of months. Good homes are
sitting on the market through the first week(s), more sellers are reducing their asking price, and
buyers are negotiating more contingencies.

This is all, in my opinion, a very good thing. This is not the bottom falling out in Arlington, rather just
regaining some much-needed balance.

Will softer market conditions lead to a drop in prices? Maybe a little. There will certainly be some
sales from the first half of this year that seem extraordinarily high versus comparable sales in the
second half of the year, but I think on aggregate we won’t see much of a dip in pricing, mostly just a
leveling off.

The best support for that theory comes from the fact that we didn’t experience the same extreme shift
in demand/pricing during the COVID market that other regional and national markets did. We were
already experiencing a competitive, moderately high-growth market prior to COVID due to natural
market forces created by increased demand on the news of a massive new employer, Amazon, so I
expect our market to be able to hold most, if not all, of its value through the cool-down. I also expect
things to pick right back up in 2023 if interest rates come down a bit by the end of the year, like
they’re expected to.

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

2020 Housing Market Review: Condos

Question: How did Arlington’s condo market perform in 2020?

Answer: I ended up writing a lot about the condo market during the second half of 2020 because of the historically high numbers of units listed for sale from July to November, falling demand, and falling market values (compared to the first half of the year). However, there were slightly positive signs in the last month of 2020 and early weeks of 2021 that the negative trends are reversing. Despite a 2nd half that looked very different from the previous three years, 2020 overall was still a strong market for condos in Arlington. Let’s take a look at how things played out…

Prices Up, Volume Down, Pace Mostly Unchanged…

The average and median price of condos increased by 4.2% and 6.3%, respectively, a strong performance but a bit short of the nearly 8% growth in 2019. I wouldn’t be surprised to see no appreciation or slightly negative appreciation in 2021 as a result of changing housing priorities from COVID.

Despite the late surge of condos listed for sale, the number of condos actually sold in 2020 dropped 8.3% from 2019 and 19.3% compared to 2018.

The speed of the market remained relatively unchanged, with average days on market staying put at 7 days and median days on market decreasing slightly from 19 days to 18.4 days. However, my preferred “speed” metric, the percentage of units selling within one week, dropped to 48% in 2020 from 52% in 2019, but still well above 2018’s 29%.

Six Interesting Charts

Below, I put together a series of charts to visualize how the Arlington condo market performed in 2020 and how that performance compares to the 2015-2019 markets.

If you’d like to discuss buying or selling strategies, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

2019 Arlington Real Estate Market Review: Condos

Question: How did the Arlington real estate market do in 2019?

Answer: Arlington’s real estate market made the national news cycle more than a few times in 2019 with some pretty extraordinary references to rapid appreciation – some accurate and some not. I’ve seen prices in some pockets of the market surge 15-20% in 2019, but for most of the market, appreciation was strong but not eye-popping.

Overall, the average and median price of a home sold in Arlington in 2019 was $705k and $610k, a 6.3% and 8.9% increase over 2018, respectively. Average days on market dropped by one week and an incredible 61.4% of buyers paid at or above the seller’s original asking price. The number of homes listed for sale in 2019 dropped about 17% compared to 2018 and demand surged, with buyers absorbing about 67% more inventory in 2019 than in 2018.

This week I will dig into how Arlington’s condo market performed in 2019 and next week I’ll do the same for the detached single-family home and townhouse market. I did separate write-ups on the 22202 (Amazon zip code) condo and detached home markets last month.

Arlington Condo Market Performance

First we’ll take a look at some of the key measures for market performance across Arlington and within North and South Arlington. This data excludes age-restricted housing (The Jefferson), Cooperatives (River Place), and townhouse-style condos (Fairlington).

  • The condo market seems to have appreciated 7-8% in 2019, after experiencing barely any growth from 2013-2017 and modest growth in 2018
  • South Arlington beat out North Arlington in every key category, which makes sense because it’s an easier price point for homeowners and investors who wanted some sort of real estate position in Arlington before Amazon’s hiring picks up
  • The average condo buyer in South Arlington paid .8% over the seller’s asking price
  • Condos in North Arlington sold twice as fast as they did from 2015-2017. In South Arlington they sold more than three times faster than 2015-2016.
Performance of Different Sub-Markets

I took a look at some of the sub-markets that make up large cross-sections of Arlington’s condo market to see how they performed compared to the overall market.

For “standard” 1BR and 2BR condos in the Rosslyn-Ballston (R-B) Corridor I specifically looked at condos in buildings constructed during the 2000s condo boom with 650-800sqft (1BR) and 950-1,200sqft (2BR).

  • “Standard” R-B 1BRs appreciated 4% in 2019
  • “Standard” R-B 2BRs appreciated 5% in 2019

For “older” 1BR and 2BR condos, I looked at those constructed in the 1940s-1960s. This category of condos had been slow to appreciate and as of 2018, a lot of owners were still trying to dig out from 2005-2007 prices.

  • Older 1BRs appreciated 7.4% in 2019
  • Older 2BRs appreciated 10.5% in 2019
Performance Within Different Price Ranges

Appreciation in Arlington’s condo market was pretty evenly distributed between the upper, middle, and lower price ranges as evidenced by the change in the average price of the lower 25%, middle 50%, and upper 25% of sales from 2018 to 2019.

  • The average price of the middle 50% of Arlington is now well north of $400k
  • Over the last two years, Arlington’s least expensive housing has appreciated the fastest, with the average price of the lower 25% increasing by more than 12% since 2017. You can likely attribute this to investor activity.
  • If you’re curious about the max sold price in 2019 of $4,750,000, it was a top floor 4,400+sqft condo at Turnberry Tower (link). It was first offered for sale three years ago for $7M. If you remove this sale from the data, the upper 25% appreciated 7.4% in 2019.
Inventory Shortage

A lot of real estate conversation in 2019 revolved around inventory shortages. The number of condos offered for sale dropped nearly 21% in 2019 and the increased demand (higher absorption rate) pushed available inventory down by more than 57%. The chart below shows the YoY quarterly decrease in new condo listings and available condo inventory in Arlington.

https://cpp1.getsmartcharts.com/chart/mls/1/getreport.php?rid=2,3&ftid=2&fid=1005&gty=4&ltid=4&lid=51013&gid=2&cc=05c500,ffc000&sid=1&mid=2&tt=2&mode=4
Looking Ahead

I will be keeping a close eye on inventory levels as this year starts off. Last year a lot of homeowners decided to withhold homes from the market in anticipation of higher Amazon-related appreciation. Now that much of the market has experienced significant appreciation, it will be interesting to see if more homeowners decide that now is the right time to sell. I expect demand will be able to keep pace with an increase in new inventory, but more inventory should keep prices a bit more level this year.

With rates remaining low through last year and projected to do so again this year, couples with a strong employment and stock market, buyer confidence is high. On the flip side, markets usually stagnate heading into an Presidential election so it’ll be interesting to see if/how the election effects counter the current momentum.

I predict that condo values will grow steadily in the 2-5% range over the next 5-10 years, but that no year in the 2020s will outpace 2019. Some possible exceptions to this are major zoning changes by Arlington to allow for more condo development (increased supply), the conversion of some large apartment buildings into condos (increased supply), or a national economic crisis (decreased demand).

Thanks for reading along! If you have any questions or I can be of any help with your real estate needs, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com. Next week we will dig into the detached single-family and townhouse markets!

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to set-up an in-person meeting to discuss local Real Estate, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com.