Are you Informed about Real Estate (Reader Poll)?

I would love to hear more from you in comments or by email (Eli@EliResidential.com) about your opinions on the availability of good real estate content – national or local market information, investing, best practices/how-to, etc. Whether it’s content you’d like to see here in my column or content you wish you could access from other sources, I’d love to hear!

Question #1: Are you informed on the real estate market?

A1: Yes, I seek out information and data regularly
A2: Somewhat, the news I follow includes enough to keep me informed
A3: Not really, I occasionally hear/read the headlines
A4: No, I don’t get any exposure to real estate news or information

Question #2: Are you happy with the real estate information/news you receive?

A1: Yes, I get exposure to the type and amount of real estate information I want
A2: No, I get real estate information but it’s not what I want
A3: No, it’s hard to find real estate information

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

Expect Listing Activity to Spike, Fade Quickly

Question: I’ve noticed a lot less homes being listed lately, will that continue for the rest of the year?

Answer: I hope everybody had a great holiday weekend! For those in the market to purchase, you’ll want to quickly shift out of vacation-mode and into house-hunting mode this week because you’ll see a lot more homes being listed for sale in the coming week(s) than you have over the last couple of months.

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Historically, September comes in just behind March and June for new listing activity, with much of that front-loaded in the week or two following Labor Day weekend. This follows a similar trend on the demand side where we see peak demand from roughly mid-March to early June, with a slowdown during the summer vacation months, followed by a brief spike in buying activity following Labor Day weekend with dwindling buyer interest through the remainder of the year.

However, the seasonal increase in September demand generally lags the pace of new inventory and thus results in the most average available listings for sale in September and October, before falling rapidly in November and December because the volume of new inventory drops by over 50%. For buyers, that means that the next 4-8 weeks will be your last chance at a wide variety of homes for sale until March.

Projected Surge in Available Inventory

As of 10AM Monday September 5, there are 369 homes listed for sales in Arlington and a whopping 42 homes in Coming Soon status, 34 of which are scheduled to hit the market within the next week. The homes in Coming Soon status will boost total inventory by nearly 10% and there are sure to be plenty of homes listed for sale over the next week that are not showing in Coming Soon.

Given the decreasing absorption rates (demand) we’re seeing in the market, I would expect that by next week we will see an increase in available inventory of well over 10% when you take the net of homes listed for sales and homes that go under contract during the same one-week period.

Effect on the Market

I expect historical trends for monthly listing activity to play out along similar patterns as those charted above. With demand steadily decreasing from earlier this year because of normal seasonal trends and massive shifts in demand due to interest rates and other factors, the next 4-8 weeks will be an interesting period to observe our market.

How much of the new inventory will be absorbed? The absorption rate (ratio of homes going under contract to homes for sale) in Arlington fell 61% from 1.17 (more homes going under contract than coming to market) in February to .46 in July (and will certainly drop further when August data is released).

How will sellers with sitting inventory react? The average days on market for the 369 homes currently for sale in Arlington is 86 days and the median is 53 days. In the last 7 days, sellers have reduced their asking price on 31 homes.

I’m looking forward to providing insights to you over the coming months on how everything plays out!

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

Pay Closer Attention to Your Condo Homeowners Insurance (HO-6)

Question: What is the difference between my individual condo insurance and the Association’s master insurance policy and do I need my own insurance?

Answer: Every condo association has its own (expensive) Master Insurance policy to cover the common elements and limited common elements, but there are substantial gaps between the association’s policy and what you’re personally liable for without an individual HO-6 policy. Most people shop for the cheapest, fastest individual insurance policy and apply just enough coverage to meet the lender’s requirements, but that may put you at financial risk.

To explain common gaps between master policies and HO-6 (individual condo) policies, I’d like to re-introduce Andrew Schlaffer, Owner and President of ACO Insurance Group. Andrew is an expert in Master Insurance policies and has helped multiple local condo association’s reduce their cost and improve their coverage since writing a column on the topic last year. If you’d like to contact Andrew directly to review your association’s master policy, you can reach him at (703) 595-9760 or andrew@acoinsgrp.com.

Take it away Andrew…

Master Insurance vs Individual Insurance Policy

Nearly all master insurance policies in this area are written on a Single Entity basis which means coverage extends to general and limited common elements but also extends within individual units to fixtures, appliances, walls, floor coverings, and cabinetry, but only for like kind and quality to that conveyed by the developer to the original owner.

Items not covered by the master insurance policy and are generally not the association’s responsibility include:

  • Personal Property (clothes, electronics, furniture, money, artwork, jewelry)
  • Betterments and Improvements (demonstrable upgrades completed after the initial conveyance)
  • Additional Living Expenses (the cost to live at a temporary location, storage fees, loss of rents)
  • Personal Liability (provides protection for bodily injury or property damage claims arising from your unit)
  • Loss Assessment (triggered only if there is a covered cause of loss and the master insurance policy limits are exhausted; this assessment would apply collectively to all unit owners)
  • Medical Payments (no fault coverage available for injured guests within your unit)

Condo owners should purchase an individual condo insurance policy (HO-6), which is also required by lenders. This policy can provide coverage for the items listed above.

Review Your Dwelling Coverage

Dwelling Coverage should be included in every HO-6 policy to avoid significant out-of-pocket expenses. Many condo associations can hold you responsible for expenses that fall under the master policy deductible that are caused by the owner’s act, neglect, misuse, or carelessness. Due to the rise in water damage losses, many insurance carriers are increasing their deductibles, which in turn spurs the need for homeowners to adjust their dwelling insurance limit.

In a recent instance, a condo suffering from significant water damage losses was required by its insurance carrier to increase the master insurance policy deductible from $10,000 to $25,000. In this community, each homeowner should have at least $25,000 of dwelling coverage to indemnify them for the deductible expense in the event a claim arises from their unit. If coverage is not available, the homeowner would either pay this expense personally or the association can put a lien on their unit.

Dwelling coverage should also include a homeowner’s betterments and improvements (improvements made above what the builder originally delivered), including those completed by prior owners. Most lenders will require at least 20% of the unit’s market value insured under this coverage as well. 

What Information to Share with Your Insurance Provider

You should always review the condo association’s governing documents and understand the applicable statutory requirements (i.e. Virginia Condominium Act) and lender requirements to verify their individual responsibilities, including maintenance/repair and insurance. Along with sharing the association documents, homeowners should also provide their personal insurance agent with the following:

  • What is the master policy deductible? ($5,000, $10,000, $25,000)
  • What approach is used for the condominium insurance coverage? (Single Entity)

My Recommendation for HO-6/Other Individual Policies

Thank you, Andrew, hopefully this helps at least a handful of readers better protect themselves.

I find that most buyers go straight for the path of least resistance and cheapest premiums for their insurance coverage. Adding coverage to your existing auto policy in 5-10 minutes probably means that nobody reviewed your association’s Master Insurance policy and thus you’re at risk of coverage gaps. Personally, I’d rather pay a bit more to know that my policies have been designed with some personal attention and reviewed annually for gaps. Andrew and his team can handle this for you as well.

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.
Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

Most Common Contract Contingencies Explained

Questions: We’re making an offer on a home that has been on the market for a few weeks and want to include contingencies, what is normal?

Answer: Contingencies can be used by buyers to reduce their risk in a real estate transaction by allowing them, in specifically defined scenarios, to renegotiate contract terms or cancel a contract without losing their Earnest Money Deposit. The three most common contingencies are the home inspection contingency, financing contingency, and appraisal contingency.

The shift in market conditions over the last 3-4 months has meant adjusting from a market where most winning offers did not include any contingencies to a market where many buyers are able to include at least one or two contingencies, often all three. This week I thought it would be helpful to refresh everybody’s understanding of the three most common contingencies and what protections they provide to buyers.

Home Inspection Contingency

  • Purpose: Allows buyers to hire a licensed home inspector who will provide a detailed assessment of a home’s condition and recommendations for repair, replacement, and maintenance.
  • Structure: The inspection contingency offers two options. One being the ability to void the contract after the inspection and the second being the option to void and the option to negotiate for repairs or credits based on the results of the inspection. 
  • Timeline: In most cases, I see inspection contingencies last 3-10 days and if there is a negotiation period, those often last 2- 5 days.

Financing Contingency

  • Purpose: Protects buyers if they do not get approved for their loan and allows them to void the contract or delay closing without losing their Earnest Money Deposit.
  • Structure: The financing contingency can either automatically expire at the end of the contingency period or extend to the closing date, unless the seller takes formal action to remove it after the contingency period ends.
  • Timeline: In most cases, I see financing contingencies last 10-24 days. It is a good idea to consult your lender on this timeline.

Appraisal Contingency

  • Purpose: Protects buyers in the event the property appraises for less than the contract purchase price. It allows a buyer the option to void, renegotiate, or proceed.
  • Structure: In some cases, through a separate addendum, buyers may agree to waive a specified difference between the appraised value and purchase price and make the appraisal contingency only if the appraisal value is below a certain number.
  • Timeline: In most cases, I see appraisal contingencies last 10-24 days. It is a good idea to consult your lender on this timeline.

As a buyer, it is important to understand that the use of, structure, and timeline of contingencies in your offer play a significant role in how a seller responds to your offer. In some cases, contingencies (or lack of) may have a greater influence on negotiations and a seller’s response than price, so it is important to approach contingencies thoughtfully and strategically based on your interest in a home, days on market, and an assortment of other factors.

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.
Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

Housing Slowdown More Extreme in Outer Suburbs

Question: Are you seeing different patterns in the housing market slowdown in different parts of the region?

Answer: In September 2020, I wrote an article highlighting how extreme the differences were between the demand shift in Arlington compared to outer suburbs like Fairfax and Loudoun Co. In short, Arlington was competitive before the COVID surge and the outer suburbs lagged far behind it, but once the COVID surge began, Arlington became moderately more competitive while the outer suburbs experienced an extreme shift in market conditions, becoming more competitive than Arlington in just a few months.

Fast-forward two years and we are seeing something of a rubberband-effect as the entire housing market slows down, with noticeable shifts in all markets, but more extreme shifts in the outer suburbs. Not that we are witnessing anything close to a crash, the market is still good for sellers, but very different than what we’ve seen the last two years.

Note: this analysis focused on the single-family/detached housing market, not condos or townhouses

Outer Suburbs Slowing Faster, Arlington King of Stability

Months of Supply (MoS), a measure of supply and demand that calculates how long existing inventory levels will last based on the current pace of demand (lower levels favor sellers), tells the story better than any other metric.

In the charts below, you can see our regional story of the pre-COVID, COVID, and current real estate market play out:

  • Competition in the outer suburbs generally trailed the DC and Arlington markets, offering buyers more time and leverage in their purchase decisions
  • After Amazon announced HQ2 in November 2018, MoS in Arlington dropped sharply as demand picked up and supply dropped, with a more modest, lagging effect on the surrounding markets
  • The COVID market from roughly summer 2020-spring 2022 sent MoS lower (favorable to sellers) in all markets, but the drop in MoS in outer suburbs was more extreme, pushing those markets well below Arlington and DC, making them extraordinarily competitive
  • As of July 2022, MoS in the outer suburbs was still lower than Arlington and DC, but rapidly increasing. The year-over-year increase in MoS in Loudoun County was 94.4%, nearly double what it was in July 2021. The increases in MoS were 67.4% (DC), 41.6% (Fairfax Co), and 27.8% (Arlington).
  • You can see the steadiness and strength of the Arlington housing market playout over the past five years in these two charts
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Market Shift is Demand-Driven

You can blame the sudden market shift almost entirely on a drop in demand, not more listing volume. Absorption Rate (AR) measures the percentage of homes going under contract compared to the number of homes for sale and is a good way of measuring demand.

In the charts below, check out the massive spikes in demand for Loudoun County during the market peaks and the rapid fall over the last few months. You’ll notice in the five-year history that the AR for all four markets shown was pretty similar pre-COVID, increased far rapidly in the outer suburbs during the COVID market, but in just the last couple of months, all four markets have come together to their “natural” pre-COVID levels.

The AR in Loudoun Co dropped 60.1% year-over-year in July and Arlington had the lowest year-over-year drop in AR of the four markets, at 35.7%. DC dropped by 48.9% and Fairfax Co by 40.6%. Loudoun Co capped out at an astonishing 3.1 AR in February, fell to 1.49 by April, and came in at .57 in July. Loudoun and Fairfax Cos remain slightly ahead of Arlington and DC, but I suspect those rankings will reverse in the August/September readings.

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Want another sign of lower demand? The average sold price as a percentage of the asking price has dropped from 105.1%-106.7% in April to 100.7%-101.4% in July. Keep in mind that these are trailing metrics because they are based on sales (usually 3-6 weeks after going under contract), so these are reading from contracts in Feb/Mar and May/June, respectively. I think we will see the average sold price to ask price drop below 100% in most or all four of these markets by the time September data is published, which will reflect contracts from July/Aug.

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Listing Activity Remains Stable

As noted above, the market shift can be attributed almost completely to lower demand because listing activity remains similar to historical volumes, even down a bit, which is an opposing force on lower demand and helping to maintain a more favorable market for sellers.

The charts below show new listings of single-family homes in Arlington, Fairfax, and Loudoun Counties, and DC, following by the same chart for the DC Metro and Northern VA region, and finally a chart just for Arlington since Arlington is a bit hard to see on the first chart. The main takeaway is that across all regional markets, the number of single-family homes being listed for sale has remained steady over the past five years and the fluctuations in market conditions are almost completely driven by changes in demand.

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If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.
Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

Influence of New Construction on Arlington Prices

Question: How much of an effect do expensive new construction homes have on the average prices in Arlington?

Answer: A couple of weeks ago I offered a mid-year review of the single-family housing (SFH) market in Arlington and average prices were a focal point. This week, we’ll look at some pricing data with and without new construction included to understand how much new builds influence our average prices. Please note that the data used below is based on new construction sales entered into the MLS and accounts for most, not all new construction sales.

New Construction Prices High, Effect Limited

So far in 2022, a new SFH home has sold for an average of nearly $1,000,000 more than resales. Sales of new SFHs have accounted for 9% of total sales but only account for a 6.8% increase in Arlington’s average home value. The numbers were similar last year.

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22207 Dominates New Construction Sales

Since 2018, the 22207 zip code has accounted for 54% of all new SFH sales in Arlington and so far in 2022, 22207 has accounted for 60.3% of new SFH sales. In 2022, new home sales have accounted for 14% of all sales in 22207 and are responsible for increasing the average home price in 22207 by $120,000.

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Average New SFH Nearly $2.2M

In 2021, the average new SFH crossed over $2M for the first time and after a 7% increase in average prices so far in 2022, the average new SFH is nearly $2.2M. There are still some markets where you might find a new house under $2M including 22205 where lots, and thus homes, tend to be smaller than neighboring North Arlington zip codes.

The 22204 zip code far out-paced other zip codes in average price appreciation for new SFH, increasing by 15% from 2021 to 2022. I expect similar double-digit growth in new construction prices in 22204 for another year or two until the gap between 22204 and other Arlington neighborhoods gets tighter. So far in 2022, new SFH outside of 22204 is selling for an average of over $2,273,000, which is 45.1% higher than new homes in 22204. The percentage gap of average prices of resale homes in 22204 versus other Arlington zip codes is similar, at 48%.

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If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

Did Interest Rates Increase .75% Last Week?

Question: Have you already seen interest rates increase since last week’s announcement that the Federal Reserve is increasing rates by .75%?

Answer: Contrary to popular belief, the news you read about the Federal Reserve increasing interest rates does not directly result in changes to the interest rates you get on your mortgage. The Federal Funds Rate is the rate that large banks charge each other for short-term, overnight loans and is one of the many market factors that influence the interest rate you get on a mortgage.

Fed Rate Up, Mortgage Rates Down

Last week, on Wednesday July 27, the Federal Reserve announced they were increasing the Federal Funds Rate by .75%. Many people I spoke with thought this meant that mortgage rates would immediately or quickly increase by a similar amount, however, the reality was that the average 30yr fixed mortgage rate, per Mortgage News Daily, decreased from 5.54% on Wednesday July 27 to 5.22% on Thursday July 28, one day after the announcement. As of yesterday, MND’s research showed that the average 30yr fixed rate had dropped even more to 5.05%.

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Mortgage Rates Are Market-Driven, Like Stocks

Mortgage rates operate like stocks in that they are constantly (daily) moving up and down as they react to changes in the domestic and global markets. In theory, mortgage rates, like stocks, are supposed to reflect the valuation of all current and future market information to determine the cost of borrowing money each day.

What the Fed Rate Means for Your Mortgage Rate

What does that mean in relation to your mortgage rate and the highly publicized Fed Funds Rate?

The Federal Reserve meets eight times per year to set monetary policy, including making any changes to their target Fed Funds Rate. Prior to those meetings, financial experts are constantly adjusting their expectations of the Federal Reserve’s rate announcements and those expectations are embedded on a daily basis into mortgage borrowing rates, so the most significant rate changes occur when expectations aren’t met or surprising guidance is issued by the Fed during these meetings (keep in mind, this isn’t the only information banks use to determine mortgage rates).

Heading into last week’s announcement, I read that mortgage rates, stocks, and other market instruments were priced with a roughly 80% expectation of a .75% increase in the Fed Funds Rates and a roughly 20% expectation of a 1% increase, so when the announcement was made confirming a .75% increase and guidance was given suggesting the Fed will soon be able to slow their rate increases, market instruments reacted in a mostly positive way, which resulted in mortgage rates decreasing because the outcome was weighted towards expectations for lower future rate increases (.75% instead of 1% and slowing future increases).

The next scheduled Federal Reserve announcement on the Federal Funds Rate is scheduled for September 21, you’ll see mortgage rates react daily based on new economic data on inflation, growth, unemployment, global threats, etc that will all influence how the Federal Reserve responds during their next meeting.

Mortgage Rate Forecasts

There’s one thing I’ve learned over the years about mortgage rate forecasts…they’re always wrong. You can see how much of a difference there is in forecasts from the experts in this recent Forbes article, with expectations for 2022 rates ranging from ~5-7% to a technical version of a shoulder shrug.

With that said, if you’re seeing news about inflation coming under control and we avoid new major global supply chain disruptions, odds are that mortgage rates will gradually come down through the end of the year. However, none of that is guaranteed as we find ourselves in a constant state of global and economic volatility and disruption, factors that generally cause instability and increases in mortgage rates. 

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

2022 Arlington Mid-Year Single-Family Home Review

Question: How did the Arlington single-family home market perform in the first half of 2022?

Answer: We have reached two years of the average single-family home (SFH) in Arlington selling for
over the asking price, but like the rest of the economy, things are finally cooling down. However, the
“cool-down” data won’t start showing up for another month or two and the data you’ll see here, a
review of the first half of 2022, reflects what was mostly a red-hot market.

More Competitive, Less Price Growth?
By nearly all measures, the first half of 2022 was more competitive than the first half of 2021, yet we
got lower average and median price growth in ’22 than in ’21, compared to the first half of the year
prior.

The competition in the first half of 2022 was unlike anything we’ve seen in Arlington before with the
average SFH selling for 4.2% more than the asking price, compared to an average of 1.8% over ask
in the first half of 2021. In 2022, an insane 79% of homes sold within the first 10 days on market,
compared to 70% in 2021 and 73% of homes sold at or above asking price in 2022, compared to 66%
in 2021.

With such intense demand, one would expect to see higher price growth in 2022 than in 2021, but
that’s not the case. The average and median price change in the first half of 2022 was 7.1% and
5.6%, respectively, compared to the first half of 2021. From 2020 to 2021, the average and median
price change was 9.6% and 16.6%, respectively.

I think the reason for conflicting demand and appreciation data is two-fold. First, the 2021
appreciation is based on the first half of 2020, which included the first few months of COVID
lockdowns when the market basically froze, so those prices may have been somewhat artificially
deflated. However, the counter argument to that is comparing the first half 2020 prices to 2019 prices,
we got a healthy 5% appreciation in average price.

The second reason, and this is just a theory, is that by 2022 the market (sellers and listing agents)
knew that buyers were accustomed to paying significantly over the asking price and thus set more
conservative (lower) asking prices to ensure competition instead of setting prices that were more
reflective of actual/likely market values. Doing so would artificially inflate some demand measures
without causing a coinciding explosion in prices.
Since the beginning of the pandemic in the first half of 2020, the market has experienced the
following:

  • Median price increased by $225,000 or 23%
  • Average price increased $197,000 or 17.5%
  • Average seller credit (towards buyer closing costs) decreased by 75%
  • The number of homes sold for $2M+ increased from 5% to 11% of total sales
  • The number of homes sold for under $1M decreased from 53% to 31% of total sales


22205 Leads Growth, 22201 Still Most Expensive
The 22201 and 22207 zip codes remain significantly more expensive than other Arlington zip codes
as the only two with an average price higher than the county-wide average. The 22205 zip code has
benefitted from tremendous growth over the past five years and led the way in the first half of 2022
price growth, adding 12.7% to its 2021 first half average.

After gaining 19.8% in 2021, 22204 settled back down to a 5.1% increase on average price in 2022
and remains the only zip code with an average price below $1M, but with more new construction
popping up throughout the 22204 neighborhoods, I don’t expect the sub-$1M average price to last
much longer.

Market Conditions Are Demand-Driven
We hear a lot about under-supply being the main cause of extreme competition and significant price
appreciation. While that is true — we have been running low over the last few years on homes actively
listed for sale — the reason for the low supply is almost exclusively demand-driven (high absorption
rates) not because the number of homes being listed for sale has collapsed. As you can see from the
chart below, illustrating the number of SFH listed for sale in each quarter over the last decade, the
amount of inventory coming to market has remained relatively consistent.

What has changed is how quickly those homes are being purchased and that has caused the
average number of SFH actively for sale to drop significantly, per the chart below. One thing that is
particularly well illustrated is how much more of an effect the Amazon HQ2 announcement
(November 2018) had on demand, and thus active supply, compared to the COVID market that had
such a dramatic effect on other regional and national markets.

Looking Ahead
We have absolutely seen a shift in market conditions over the last couple of months. Good homes are
sitting on the market through the first week(s), more sellers are reducing their asking price, and
buyers are negotiating more contingencies.

This is all, in my opinion, a very good thing. This is not the bottom falling out in Arlington, rather just
regaining some much-needed balance.

Will softer market conditions lead to a drop in prices? Maybe a little. There will certainly be some
sales from the first half of this year that seem extraordinarily high versus comparable sales in the
second half of the year, but I think on aggregate we won’t see much of a dip in pricing, mostly just a
leveling off.

The best support for that theory comes from the fact that we didn’t experience the same extreme shift
in demand/pricing during the COVID market that other regional and national markets did. We were
already experiencing a competitive, moderately high-growth market prior to COVID due to natural
market forces created by increased demand on the news of a massive new employer, Amazon, so I
expect our market to be able to hold most, if not all, of its value through the cool-down. I also expect
things to pick right back up in 2023 if interest rates come down a bit by the end of the year, like
they’re expected to.

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

2022 Arlington Mid-Year Condo Review

Question: How did the Arlington condo market perform in the first half of 2022?

Answer: It has been quite a ride for the Arlington condo market over the past four years!
After a long stretch of relatively little appreciation from ~2013-2018, the condo market surged on the November 2018 news of Amazon HQ2 and then flatlined when COVID lockdowns began in the spring of 2020. Beginning in the summer of 2020, condo inventory flooded the market in record volume, causing the market to soften and prices to drop.

Conditions were improving by the summer of 2021 as demand picked up. By early 2022, competition return to the market with more multiple offers and escalations. The competition didn’t last long, as the entire housing market began to slow due to high interest rates and worsening economic conditions. After much volatility in the condo market since late 2018, I think we are finally seeing signs of the market finding its natural balance — moderately favorable for sellers, while providing buyers with a range of options and the occasional opportunity for a discount.

Let’s look at the stats behind the first half of the 2022 Arlington condo market…

Pace of New Inventory Evens Out

From 2013-2018, the Arlington condo market averaged ~500 and ~700 new listing in the first and second quarter, respectively. Those numbers dropped off a cliff in 2019 and 2020 because people chose to hold properties because of Amazon’s announcement (Q1 2019-Q1 2020) and then held in Q2 2020 because nobody knew what to do when COVID hit. Then the pace of inventory surged at a record-shattering pace from the summer of 2020 through the end of 2021.

Inventory levels finally came down to earth, closer to their 2013-2018 averages, with 576 and 651 new condo listings in the first and second quarters of 2022, respectively.

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Supply/Demand Levels Back to Normal-ish

With the easing of new inventory volume and demand coming back to level, Months of Supply (a measure that combines supply levels with the pace of demand) has returned to levels more in-line with pre-Amazon years and what I would consider to be the Arlington condo market’s natural balance.

Housing economists consider six months of supply to be a truly balanced market for buyers and sellers, but we rarely see a sub-market around here that gets close to six months. 1.5-2 months of supply is a favorable market for sellers, but it usually takes less than one month of supply for multiple offers and escalations to become a common occurrence. 

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Demand Metrics Tell Similar Story

The return to balance is showing up on the supply and demand sides of the equation, although demand seems to be marginally stronger that it was pre-Amazon announcement, which I’d attribute to how expensive townhouse/single-family properties have gotten lately, driving more demand towards less expensive condos.

What we can see from the chart below is that the speed of the market, measured by the percentage of properties going under contract within the first ten days, has improved over last year but has fallen well below 2019/2020 levels. The same goes for the percentage of properties selling for at or above the asking price.

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Good Half-Year for Two-Bedroom Condos

All pricing data points to the first half of 2022 being a great year for two-bedroom condos and an okay year for one-bedroom units. Here are some key pricing data points:

  • The median price of a two-bedroom condo increased 11.7% to $550,000 in the first half of 2022 compared to the first half of 2021
  • The median price of a one-bedroom increased 3% to $380,000
  • The average price of a two-bedroom increased 15.7% to $620,616 compared to 3% to $381,220 for a one-bedroom condo
  • On a $/SqFt basis, two-bedroom condos increased 7.4% to $517/SqFt compared to 2.8% to $497/SqFt for one-bedrooms

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If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.

Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH Real Estate, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.

Should Your Condo Building Have a Rental Cap?

Question: Do you think it is a good idea for our condo board to consider setting a cap on the number of units that can be rented at a given time?

Answer: One of the most common debates within condo buildings is whether an Association should limit the number of condo units that can be rented concurrently. There are some benefits of limiting the number of owners who can rent out their unit(s), but I think it’s the wrong decision for most buildings because it can hurt property values and is unnecessary, in most cases.

For the sake of clarity, when I refer to rental/investor units in a building, I am referring to individual unit owners renting their unit(s) out to tenants instead of occupying it themselves (they are considered investors).

Lending Misinformation

There is a lot of misinformation out there about how the number of rental units in a building effect the warrantability of a building (ability of future buyers to secure a mortgage). Here are the limits you need to be aware of:

  • Fannie/Freddie Loans: Conventional loans backed by Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac do not have any rental limits for primary and secondary home loans. They limited the number of rentals in a building to 50% for investor loans only.
  • VA (Veterans) Loans: No rental limits. The VA does not like seeing rental caps and may not approve a building for VA loans if they do have rental limits in place.
  • FHA Loans: FHA loans are restricted in buildings with more than 50% of units rented. FHA loans represent a small percentage of the loans written in this area.
  • Jumbo/Private Loans: High balance loans (over $970,800 loan amount), not insured by Fannie/Freddie, have a wide range of guidelines. Some have rental restrictions and others don’t, but in general jumbo/private loans tend to have more conservative lending guidelines and a higher chance of restricting a loan due to the number of units being rented. However, many banks will make exceptions, especially with higher (30%+) down payments and there are many alternative lending options in the jumbo/private arena a buyer can choose from.

Pro: Better Quality of Living

Owner-occupants generally invest more in their home, take better care of common areas, and take more pride in developing a strong social community. In small associations or those intent on maintaining a certain standard of living, quality of living may prevail over property value.

Cons: Buyer Turn-Off, Forced Sales

Many buyers want to keep their options open to renting a unit out after they are done using it as their primary residence and are turned off by the idea of a rental cap and plenty will not buy in a building if there is a cap, even if it’s unlikely to be reached. By turning otherwise motivated and qualified buyers away, you’re bound to hurt the market value of units in your building.

If a rental cap is reached and enforced, it can hurt market values even more because homeowners are forced to sell if they move out and a forced sale may result in a homeowner agreeing to take a worse deal when they would have otherwise chosen to rent the unit until they can sell into a strong market.

Track Rental Activity in Your Building

Even if you do not have a rental cap, it’s still important to track which units are being rented out. At a minimum, your Board/Management should receive a copy of each lease and keep a basic spreadsheet to be able to report on which units are being rented. In my experience, I have found that most buildings in Arlington settle into a rental percentage of 20-35%. For some buildings, like those in the heart of Clarendon, I see higher rental percentages, sometimes exceeding 50%.

If you’d like to discuss buying, selling, investing, or renting, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at Eli@EliResidential.com.

If you’d like a question answered in my weekly column or to discuss buying, selling, renting, or investing, please send an email to Eli@EliResidential.com. To read any of my older posts, visit the blog section of my website at EliResidential.com. Call me directly at (703) 539-2529.

Video summaries of some articles can be found on YouTube on the Ask Eli, Live With Jean playlist.
Eli Tucker is a licensed Realtor in Virginia, Washington DC, and Maryland with RLAH | @properties, 4040 N Fairfax Dr #10C Arlington VA 22203. (703) 390-9460.